What is an Outpatient Detox Program?

What is an Outpatient Detox Program?

Detox is an essential part of the recovery process. It can happen in an inpatient or outpatient setting. Both have their share of advantages and disadvantages, and it’s important to find the option that’s right for you.

This article will discuss what’s involved in an outpatient detox program so you can determine if its’ your best option.

What is Outpatient Treatment?

Outpatient treatment is a type of treatment that does not require the patient to be checked into the facility overnight. It differs from an inpatient treatment, which involves the patient staying at the facility for days, weeks, or months at a time.

In addiction recovery, outpatient treatment comes in one of three forms as follows:

Partial Hospitalization: Individuals in a partial hospitalization program may stay at the facility for 6 – 8 hours a day. They will get therapy while they are there. After their day is over, they can go back to their families. Day and nighttime sessions are available. 

Intensive Outpatient: Intensive outpatient can be a primary treatment or a step down from partial hospitalization. It involves a few therapy sessions a week. 

Outpatient: Outpatient treatment requires the patient to see a therapist just once or twice a week. It is the final stage of care, but it can be ongoing to assist in managing sobriety.

What is a Detox Program?

A detox program helps get a patient through the detox stages of recovery. This is the stage of rehab that involves the patient allowing their body to rid itself of harmful toxins.

Detox is often the most difficult stage of recovery as the patient will experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. They occur because the patient’s body is not used to being without the drug in their system. The symptoms are produced as they struggle to get back to sobriety.

Patients know that the only way to get relief from these symptoms long-term is to do more of the drug. Therefore, relapse is common at this stage of recovery.

A medical staff supervises the patient throughout detox to keep them as comfortable as possible. They provide medications to reduce symptoms and provide a soothing atmosphere that promotes a positive physical and mental state. They oversee the process to ensure relapse doesn’t occur.

What is an Outpatient Detox Program? 

An outpatient detox program involves the patient meeting with a counselor. The counselor will provide a detox plan which may include nutrition and lifestyle strategies that help them maintain sobriety during this difficult time.

The patient may also go to the clinic to receive medication that reduces symptoms to ensure relapse doesn’t occur. While therapy doesn’t typically take place until detox is complete, a therapy plan may be worked out during the detox stages.

Outpatient detox is recommended for patients that have a stable home environment. If there is abuse and neglect happening at home, it will make the patient more likely to relapse. Individuals will need support from their friends and family to make it through.

Outpatient detox programs in Atlanta may not be the best choice for people who are trying to overcome an addiction to alcohol, benzodiazepines, and opioids. These drugs are highly addictive and more likely to result in relapse. Inpatient treatment is a better choice for these addictions as it allows the patient to be monitored 24/7 to ensure relapse doesn’t occur.

How to Find Outpatient Detox Programs

Many facilities offer an outpatient detox program. But how do you find the one that’s right for you? It would help if you considered the atmosphere, the staff, the treatments offered, and other factors.

It can take a while to find a center that’s best suited to your needs. But you can save yourself time by contacting Atlanta Recovery Place first.

At Atlanta Recovery Place, we understand that each patient has unique needs. We work out customized treatment plans that are best suited to the individual’s situation. We provide a variety of outpatient therapies, ensuring you achieve your recovery goals. 
The detox process is not easy to get through, but a well-planned outpatient detox can help. Contact Atlanta Recovery Place to find out how we can get you through this crucial stage of rehab. Then look forward to achieving the health and happiness you deserve.

Can PTSD Cause Alcoholism?

Can PTSD Cause Alcoholism?

Post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is a mental health disorder that can be debilitating, often leaving a person feeling stuck with a constant sense of danger and memories that can be excruciatingly painful. People with PTSD typically have experienced or witnessed a traumatic event such as a war or combat, a severe accident, a natural disaster, a terrorist act, or faced some form of threat of sexual violence, serious injury, or death. In severe cases, sufferers might turn to substances, including alcohol, to reduce these intense feelings of danger and to avoid painful, unwanted memories.

What are the Symptoms of PTSD?

People who have PTSD experience intense, disturbing feelings and thoughts that relate to their traumatic experience(s), lasting long after the event has ended. Many people begin experiencing symptoms within four weeks of the traumatic event, but in some cases, symptoms do not appear until years later. PTSD symptoms can adversely affect a person’s relationships, including those at work or school, as well as interfere with their ability to go about typical daily tasks.

The symptoms of PTSD fall into four categories:

Intrusive memories – Symptoms involve recurrent, unwanted memories (including dreams and nightmares) of the traumatic event that are distressing to the individual in addition to flashbacks. Severe emotional distress and physical reactions may occur when something reminds the sufferer of the traumatic event.

Avoidance – Symptoms may include taking steps to avoid thinking or talking about the traumatic event as well as avoiding specific people, places, or activities that remind a person of the event.

Negative Changes in Thinking and Mood – Symptoms include negative thoughts about oneself, other people, or the world overall. Feelings of hopelessness and emotional numbness, in addition to lack of interest in activities once enjoyed may overwhelm people with PTSD. Memory problems, emotional detachment from family and friends, and difficulty experiencing positive emotions may also occur.

Changes in Emotional/Physical Reactions – Symptoms may involve always being on guard out of fear of danger, being easily frightened or startled, difficulty concentrating, feelings of overwhelming guilt or shame, trouble sleeping, or self-destructive behavior, such as drinking too much alcohol or getting in trouble with the law.

What Causes PTSD?

The cause of PTSD can vary by individual. PTSD is likely caused by a complex combination of:

  • Stressful life experiences
  • A person’s temperament
  • Inherited mental health risks
  • The way a person’s brain regulates hormones and chemicals released in response to stress

Can PTSD Cause Alcoholism?

If you or a loved one suffers from PTSD, you might ask, “can PTSD cause alcoholism?” The short answer is yes – PTSD and alcoholism often go hand-in-hand.

PTSD changes the chemistry in the brain in a similar way that substance abuse and addiction do. These disorders often develop around the same time and feed off each other. The trauma that causes PTSD can also lead to a substance use disorder, including alcoholism. According to one study, women with PTSD are 2.48 times more likely to meet the criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence than women without PTSD, and men were 2.06 times more likely than those without PTSD.

The desire to avoid thinking about or reliving traumatic events or experiencing trauma-related emotions can cause a person to turn to alcohol, which may provide temporary relief from the intrusive thoughts and feelings. Some people drink to try to experience positive emotions because alcohol use may improve their mood. Unfortunately, when the effects of alcohol begin to fade, negative emotions that are associated with alcohol withdrawal can intensify PTSD symptoms. The process of “numbing” one’s pain by alcohol use is often referred to as “self-medication” and comes with many risks, including the development of alcoholism, which can lead to an increased risk of health problems in addition to making PTSD more difficult to treat in the long run.

How to Find Dual Diagnosis Treatment Near Me

If you or someone you care about has PTSD and you are concerned about PTSD and alcohol dependency, it is important to know that finding support for PTSD as well as alcohol abuse is highly recommended. When both issues are addressed, the root cause of PTSD and alcohol dependency can be treated. Atlanta Recovery Place offers outpatient treatment in Atlanta for anyone suffering from addiction or dual diagnosis disorders, as well as aftercare treatment, including sober living in Georgia.
Helping a loved one with co-occurring PTSD and alcoholism can be difficult, but recovery is possible. The caring professionals at Atlanta Recovery Place offer comprehensive treatment for PTSD in Georgia. For more information, reach out today.

What are the Signs of PTSD?

What are the Signs of PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a condition caused by a traumatic incident that occurs at some point in a person’s life. It produces persistent feelings of stress and anxiety. It can get in the way of the individual’s ability to function on a day-to-day basis. PTSD can be challenging to deal with, but it can be managed. With the proper treatment, the condition may go away completely. This article will discuss the signs of PTSD and how to get help. 

What is PTSD?

PTSD is a mental health disorder caused by a traumatic event. The person with the condition may have experienced the event firsthand, or they may have witnessed it. It causes nightmares, flashbacks, anxiety, and stress. It can last for months or even years. 

What Causes PTSD?

PTSD is caused by a traumatic incident. Examples include:

  • Domestic Abuse: Victims of domestic abuse often suffer from PTSD. 
  • An Accident: If you experienced or witnessed a terrible accident, such as a car accident, you may experience PTSD, especially when you feel a similar incident could occur again. 
  • War: Many war veterans experience flashbacks and nightmares relating to the things they saw and did while serving. 
  • Physical or Sexual Assault: People who experience sexual assault may deal with ongoing episodes of PTSD.
  • Childbirth Experiences: A difficult childbirth or losing a baby can cause PTSD.

It’s not clear why people develop PTSD because of these incidents. Theories include:

  • The Survival Mechanism: People may develop symptoms like flashbacks to prepare them if a similar incident happens again. 
  • High Adrenaline Level: Studies have shown that people with PTSD have abnormally high-stress hormone levels. It’s unclear whether PTSD causes these heightened levels or whether it’s the other way around. 
  • Changes in the Brain: Brain scans have shown that people with PTSD have smaller hippocampi, the part of the brain responsible for memory and emotions. This may cause it to malfunction and prevent flashbacks and nightmares from being properly processed, leading to ongoing anxiety. 

What are the Signs of PTSD?

Seeing the warning signs of PTSD is vital in catching the issue before it becomes more serious. People with PTSD may experience the following symptoms: 

  • Recurrent, unpleasant memories of the traumatic event
  • Flashbacks that make it seem as if the event is happening again
  • Upsetting dreams and nightmares related to the event
  • Severe emotional and physical reactions when something reminds you of the event
  • Avoiding places and people that remind you of the event
  • Trying not to think about the event
  • General feelings of depression and anxiety
  • Withdrawal from society
  • Troubled relationships
  • Memory problems
  • Being easily startled or frightened
  • Self-destructive behavior
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Mood swings
  • Feelings of guilt and shame
  • Difficulty concentrating

It’s also not uncommon for there to be a relationship between PTSD and addiction. They may not want to come forward about their PTSD because they don’t want to admit they have a problem. They may not have the time or money to deal with the issue, or they may not think their condition is that bad. 

Instead of reaching out for help, they self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. While these may temporarily relieve symptoms, they make matters worse in the long run. The person now has two disorders to deal with, the addiction and PTSD. 

How to Find PTSD Treatment Programs

Many programs treat PTSD and linked addictions and mental disorders, but it can be difficult to find the one that’s right for you. You can spend hours researching to find the perfect facility, or you can save yourself time by contacting Atlanta Recovery Place first. 

At Atlanta Recovery Place, we realize that every patient is different. We work out customized plans that are best suited to each client’s needs. We believe this is the best approach in ensuring long-term recovery. 

We utilize a variety of outpatient treatments so you can recover without spending a lot of time away from work and family. We integrate dual diagnosis therapy that simultaneously treats the addiction and its underlying cause. We follow up with aftercare giving you the support you need to maintain sobriety. 
PTSD is not easy to deal with, and it can be even more difficult if it’s accompanied by addiction. Atlanta Recovery Place provides the tools you need to move on to a higher quality of life. Contact us to find out the best ways to achieve the happiness you deserve.

Is There Outpatient Rehab for Opioid Addiction?

Is There Outpatient Rehab for Opioid Addiction?

Opioid addiction is an all too prevalent problem in America and worldwide. According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, more than 2 million Americans abuse opioids every year, and an average of 90 die of opioid abuse overdoses every day. 

Fortunately, there are ways to treat opioid addiction, and many of them don’t require you to stay in a rehab facility 24/7. Outpatient rehab for opioid addiction is a good solution if you need to recover from drugs and don’t have the time to take off from work and family. This article will let you know what’s involved in the process. 

What are Opioids? 

Opioids are drugs that are derived from the opium poppy plant. They work to block pain signals between the brain and body and are often prescribed to treat moderate to severe pain. 

There are many types of opioid drugs that can be prescribed, including Oxycontin, Vicodin, and fentanyl. Heroin, a common illegal drug, is also an opioid. 

Many people become addicted to opioids when taking them as a prescription for pain. When the addiction gets out of control, and they can no longer source the pills from a doctor, they may start getting heroin from a street dealer instead. 

Are Opioids Addictive?

Yes, opioids are highly addictive. They release endorphins which increase feelings of pleasure. When the effect wears off, the person may want to continue experiencing the pleasure that comes from the drug. 

After taking the drug for a while, the body will not produce as many endorphins when it’s in the system. Therefore, the person will need to take more of the drug to get the same effect. An increased dose is an early sign of addiction. 

But what will really seal the deal is withdrawal symptoms. Once the body gets used to having the opioid in its system, it will be unable to function correctly without it. It will begin to produce unpleasant physical and mental symptoms. The person knows the only way to get rid of these symptoms short term is to do more of the drug. And so continues the vicious cycle.

What are the signs of Opioid Addiction?

Withdrawal symptoms and increased tolerance are two signs of opioid addiction. Here are some others to look out for. 

  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Lack of motivation
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Poor decision making
  • Shallow breathing
  • Financial difficulties
  • Legal trouble
  • Abandoning responsibilities
  • Trying to get multiple prescriptions from various doctors
  • Troubled relationships

Is There Outpatient Rehab for Opioid Addiction?

Opioid addiction is not easy to overcome, but outpatient opioid treatment is available, fortunately. Outpatient opioid rehab options include:

Partial Hospitalization: This involves the patient attending a facility for therapy 6-8 hours a day. They can spend the rest of the time at work or with family. Day and night sessions are available. 

Intensive Outpatient and Outpatient: Intensive outpatient and outpatient treatment programs can be a primary form of care or can be used as a follow-up to partial hospitalization. Intensive outpatient involves several visits to therapy a week, while outpatient is just one or two a week or as needed. 

These options are ideal if you have a healthy home environment that supports your healing. They are also recommended for people who can’t take time away from family and friends to attend an inpatient rehab and those who can’t afford inpatient rehab. 

How Atlanta Recovery Place Can Help

Finding the best type of treatment and facility can make all the difference when it comes to a successful recovery. If you are trying to find the center that’s right for you, Atlanta Recovery Place may be the best option. 

Atlanta Recovery Place understands that each client is different. We work out a customized plan for all our patients. We take a dual diagnosis approach to treatment, simultaneously treating both the addiction and its underlying cause.  

We offer various types of outpatient care, including outpatient, intensive outpatient, and partial hospitalization. We provide various therapies, ensuring you find one best suited to your needs. Our staff is qualified in treating a wide range of addictions. 
Opioids are powerful drugs. Don’t let them take over your life. Call Atlanta Recovery Place to get on a path to wellness and long-term recovery

Is There a Test for Bipolar Disorder?

Is There a Test for Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder is a type of mental illness characterized by periods of extreme highs and devastating lows. It can be quite difficult to deal with, and it can negatively affect the person with the disorder as well as those around them.

Fortunately, bipolar disorder is manageable. But the first step is diagnosing the issue. If your doctor feels you may be affected, they may give you a test for bipolar disorder. Once they figure out what the issue is, they can work out a treatment plan to keep it under control. This article will discuss the bipolar test and the disorder so you can determine the best way to care for yourself or a loved one. 

What is Bipolar Disorder? 

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition characterized by periods of emotional highs, also called mania or hypomania, and devastating lows or depression. When mania is experienced, the person will feel euphoric, energetic, and irritable. When lows are hit, the individual will have a feeling of hopelessness and a loss of interest in the things they once loved. 

Mood swings can occur occasionally or multiple times a year. Some people may have milder symptoms between episodes, while others may have none. There is no cure for the disorder, but you may be able to treat it with medications and therapy. 

There are various types of bipolar disorder, including the following:

  • Bipolar I Disorder: People with bipolar I will have at least one manic episode followed by a depressive or hypomanic episode. The mania may be accompanied by psychosis. 
  • Bipolar II Disorder: Individuals with bipolar II will have at least one depressive episode and at least one hypomanic episode, but they will never experience mania. 
  • Cyclothymic Disorder: Those with cyclothymic disorder will have at least two years of hypomanic episodes and mild depressive episodes (one year in children and teens). 
  • Other types: Bipolar disorder can also come on as a result of doing drugs or as a symptom of certain diseases and health conditions. 

What are the Signs of Bipolar Disorder?

Bipolar disorder signs include the following: 

Mania and Hypomania:

  • Excessively energetic
  • Agitation and irritability 
  • Exaggerated sense of self-confidence
  • Decreased need for sleep
  • Excessive talkativeness
  • Racing thoughts
  • Easily distracted
  • Poor decision making that can lead to dangerous results

Depression: 

  • Feelings of hopelessness and sadness
  • Loss of interest in the activities you once enjoyed
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Changes in weight and appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of ability to concentrate
  • Suicidal thoughts

Is There a Test for Bipolar Disorder?

If you suspect you have a mental issue, you may want to get tested for bipolar disorder. This will help you figure out what’s troubling you so you can get the treatment you need. A bipolar test involves talking to a medical health professional. The criteria for the diagnosis are available in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnosis of Mental Disorders. During the test, you will be asked about your symptoms and how long they have been occurring. 

The doctor may also give you a physical exam to rule out the possibility of other conditions causing mental issues. While you may find a test for bipolar disorder online, these are not necessarily valid sources. Only a medical professional can give you an accurate diagnosis. 

Finding the Best Bipolar Treatment for Me

It’s not uncommon for people with bipolar disorder to self-medicate with drugs. While the drugs may provide temporary relief from symptoms, they will make things worse in the long run, especially if an addiction forms. 

If you are dealing with bipolar disorder and addiction, Atlanta Recovery Place can get you the help you need. Atlanta Recovery Place takes a dual diagnosis approach that simultaneously treats the illness and its underlying cause. We work with each of our patients to come up with a customized plan that’s best suited to their needs. We follow up with aftercare to ensure that the patient maintains sobriety long-term. 
If you are struggling with bipolar disorder and addiction, it is possible to get help. Atlanta Recovery can assist you in reaching your recovery goals. Contact us to find out how to say goodbye to what’s holding you back and hello to a happier existence.

What is the Relationship Between Depression and Genetics?

What is the Relationship Between Depression and Genetics?

Many of us experience depression occasionally. But for some of us, the emotion is ongoing. It can come about for seemingly no reason and last for days, weeks, months, or years. It can get in the way of a person being able to perform the most basic tasks. For years, researchers have been trying to uncover the causes of depression, and the relationship between depression and genetics. Once they get to its underlying roots, they are better prepared to come up with a solution. It has been proven that people who have a close family member who is dealing with depression will be more likely to develop it themselves. This article will look at the relationship between depression and genetics so you can see how the two relate.  

What is Depression?

Depression is defined as a lowering of mood. People with a depressive disorder will feel bad more often than they feel good. This imbalance may go on for days, weeks, or months.

There are several types of depression, including the following:

  • Major Depressive Disorder occurs when a person feels depressed most of the time for a period that lasts two weeks or longer.
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder is similar to Major Depressive Disorder, but the condition may last two years or longer.
  • Bipolar disorder is characterized by periods of soaring highs and devastating lows.
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder is brought on by gloomy, cold weather.
  • Psychotic depression is a type of depression accompanied by hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia.

What are the Symptoms of Depression?

The symptoms of depression may vary depending on what type of depression you are dealing with, but they generally include the following:

  • Loss of interest in the things you once loved
  • Withdrawal from society
  • Fatigue and lack of energy
  • Restlessness and agitation
  • Difficulty concentrating and making decisions
  • Weight loss or weight gain
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness
  • Suicidal thoughts

What is the Relationship Between Depression and Genetics?

Scientists reveal a strong case for hereditary depression based on the following theories.

It has been suggested that people with depression may be dealing with the condition due to a lack of substances in the brain called neurotransmitters. The imbalance may be inherited from a close relative. Antidepressant medications may be used to treat this type of genetic depression.

Environmental factors can also contribute to depression. For example, if a person had a parent with depression, they may copy their behaviors and become depressed themselves. They may also develop the disorder from dealing with the difficult atmosphere the parent created when they were growing up. This can be considered genetic depression as well.

How to Find Treatment for Depression and Addiction

Many people that are depressed self-medicate to deal with their symptoms. They may be reluctant to come forward because they are afraid of what people think of them. They may not want to reach out because they don’t think their issues are that bad or may not have the time or money to deal with them.

Instead of getting the help they need, they turn to drugs and alcohol to relieve their symptoms. This takes them on a vicious cycle that only makes matters worse.

Fortunately, there are facilities available that offer treatment for depression and addiction. They take a dual diagnosis approach that simultaneously addresses the condition and its underlying causes. This is an effective method in ensuring long-term recovery.

There are many centers that offer care for depression and addiction, but which one is right for you? You can spend hours trying to find the perfect option, or you can save yourself time by contacting Atlanta Recovery Place first.

At Atlanta Recovery Place, we understand that each patient is different. We work out a customized plan that is best suited to their needs. We offer a variety of outpatient treatments so you can recover while going about your everyday life. Our therapies address addiction and its underlying causes so you can achieve your rehab goals. The relationship between depression and genetics, and how it impacts addiction can get you on a vicious cycle. Atlanta Recovery Place will give you a hand in getting off the hamster’s wheel. Call us to find out how we can help you find the happiness you deserve.

Can Anxiety Cause Addiction?

Can Anxiety Cause Addiction?

Anxiety is an emotion most of us know all too well. If we are worried about something, it can send our hearts racing and put us on edge until the issue gets resolved. 

But for some people, anxiety is more than a temporary emotion. It can come about for seemingly no reason, and it can last for days or months on end. 

People that are dealing with this type of anxiety should get help for their issues, but not everyone does. When the issue goes untreated, it could cause people to turn to drugs and alcohol to relieve their symptoms. While the drugs provide temporary relief, they often make things worse in the long run. 

This article will further explore the question of, can anxiety cause addiction so you can see the connection. 

What is Anxiety? 

Anxiety is characterized by feelings of overwhelming fear and worry. Symptoms include:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Sweating 
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability 
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Trembling
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Digestive issues
  • Avoiding things that cause anxiety
  • Trembling
  • Restlessness

People with an anxiety disorder will have persistent feelings of anxiety and may not be tied to any specific matter. The emotion can get so bad that it gets in the way of their ability to function. 

There are several types of anxiety. Here are some of the most common:

  • General Anxiety Disorder is characterized by persistent feelings of anxiety that may not be tied to any one incident. 
  • Separation Anxiety may be triggered if the individual is separated from a certain person or place. 
  • Social anxiety occurs when the person is in social situations or crowds. 
  • Phobias are intense fears of a specific person, place, thing, or situation. 
  • Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder characterized by panic attacks. 
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is anxiety brought on by a traumatic event the person experienced. 
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) involves engaging in a behavior because the person feels it will yield a certain outcome. It is an unhealthy way to deal with anxiety. 

What is the Relationship Between Anxiety and Addiction?

Individuals with an anxiety disorder may be best off getting help from a professional, but many choose not to reach out. They may be afraid of what people will think of them if they find out they have a mental disorder. They may not believe their problem is that bad or may not have the time and money for services. 

Instead of getting help, many people with anxiety disorders self-medicate with drugs and alcohol. While certain drugs may temporarily relieve symptoms, they ultimately lead the person on a downward spiral. 

Now, they will have to deal with both anxiety and addiction and all the problems that come with it. This can include legal issues, financial troubles, troubled relationships, and health issues. 

How to Find Treatment for Anxiety and Addiction

Fortunately, there are clinics that treat both anxiety and addiction. They simultaneously target the addiction and its underlying causes making for a dual diagnosis approach. This is an ideal method for long-term recovery. 

Many clinics offer help for addiction, but it’s not easy to find the one that’s right for you. It would help if you considered the environment, the treatments offered, the competence of the staff, and other factors to come up with the center that’s best suited to your needs. You can spend hours trying to find the perfect solution, or you can save yourself time by contacting Atlanta Recovery Place first. 

At Atlanta Recovery Place, we understand that every patient is different. We work out individualized plans for each of our clients based on their addiction and its underlying causes. We integrate dual diagnosis into a variety of therapies based on the individual’s needs. 

We offer various types of outpatient treatment, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient. This allows patients to recover while going about their everyday lives. Our therapies are paired with a structured environment and a team-based approach that will enable patients to focus on recovery. 
Fighting anxiety and addiction is not easy. Atlanta Recovery Place provides the assistance you need to make it through. Contact us to find out how we can help you achieve a higher quality of living.

Is Anxiety Hereditary?

Is Anxiety Hereditary?

Many of us deal with anxiety. The stress of everyday living can get too much, pushing us over the edge. Fortunately, for most people, stress is a temporary emotion that goes away in time.

However, there are some of us that experience persistent feelings of anxiety. The emotion may come out of nowhere, and it can linger for weeks and months at a time. It may hold us back from functioning normally.

People who feel anxiety on an ongoing basis may be dealing with a disorder. Part of treating a condition is understanding its cause.

Many experts feel that anxiety could be a hereditary condition. But is this true? This article will answer the question, is anxiety hereditary so you can get to the root of your emotional issues.

What is Anxiety?

Everyone feels anxiety occasionally, but if you are experiencing it on a regular basis, seemingly for very little or no reason, you may have an anxiety disorder. Symptoms of anxiety include the following:

  • Nervousness
  • A sense of impending danger
  • Increased heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Sweating
  • Trembling
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling weak
  • Trouble concentrating due to excessive worry
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Digestive issues
  • Uncontrollable worry
  • Avoiding things that cause anxiety

What are Common Anxiety Disorders?

There are several types of anxiety disorders, including:

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder is characterized by feelings of anxiety that may be ongoing and caused by nothing or an insignificant incident.
  • Phobias are intense fears of a particular person, animal, object, or situation.
  • Social anxiety disorder is characterized by feelings of stress or nervousness when in a social setting.
  • Panic disorder is a type of anxiety that involves panic attacks.
  • Separation anxiety occurs when a person becomes anxious when they are away from a certain person or people or a specific place.
  • Selective mutism is a type of response a person has to anxiety. So, when they feel stress or fear, they may choose not to talk or communicate.
  • Substance-induced anxiety disorder occurs in people who abuse substances. The substance changes the chemicals in their brain, making them more prone to anxiety. An anxiety-induced substance disorder that occurs when people self-medicate their anxiety issues with illicit drugs is a twist on this.

Is Anxiety Hereditary?

A variety of factors can cause anxiety, but it can be hereditary in some cases. A person with a close relative who has anxiety is 2 to 6 times more likely to develop the disorder than those who do not have a family history of mental illness.

There are many ways anxiety is inherited. For example, some researchers feel that a chemical imbalance causes anxiety and other mental illnesses. It is thought that you can inherit the chemical imbalance from your parents.

In other situations, a parent with an anxiety disorder may cause a stressful environment in the home that causes the child to have high-stress tendencies. Or the child may imitate a parent’s stressful reactions and become stressed out themselves.

And while the answer to the question, is anxiety genetic, is yes, other things can cause anxiety. These include:

  • Drugs abuse
  • Certain medications
  • Certain illnesses
  • Exposure to trauma
  • A high-stress personality type

How to Find Anxiety Treatment Near Me

If you are dealing with anxiety, it’s essential to get help. Anxiety can greatly reduce the quality of life. Talking to someone will help you achieve the high quality of living you deserve.

There are many options for anxiety treatment, but if you are dealing with a co-occurring substance abuse disorder, a rehab facility will be your best bet. The staff will treat the addiction and its underlying cause to provide long-lasting recovery. Atlanta Recovery Place is your best option for finding the care you need. Atlanta Recovery Place offers a dual diagnosis approach that simultaneously treats addiction and anxiety. We offer a variety of outpatient programs that allow you to go about your everyday life while working on your treatment goals. Our caring staff will be there for you every step of the way.

How to Find the Best Outpatient Alcohol Programs Near Me

How to Find the Best Outpatient Alcohol Programs Near Me

Finding the best treatment is essential if you are trying to recover from alcohol addiction. You will need to consider whether you want inpatient or outpatient alcohol treatment. Both offer their share of benefits and are recommended in different situations.

This article will let you know what’s involved in outpatient programs for alcoholism and provide tips on how to find outpatient alcohol programs near me.

What is Outpatient Treatment?

Outpatient treatment is any type of treatment that requires some amount of time in therapy and some amount of time at home. It differs from inpatient treatment that requires you to stay in the facility 24/7 until you recover.

Outpatient treatment is typically available in three forms. These include:

  • Partial Hospitalization: This type of treatment will require you to be in therapy 6-8 hours a day. You will spend the rest of your time going about your everyday life.
  • Intensive Outpatient: Intensive outpatient is a step down from partial hospitalization. Patients will require therapy a few times a week.
  • Outpatient: Patients in an outpatient program may have therapy just once or twice a week. It may be ongoing as a way for them to continue managing their addiction.

Outpatient can be a primary therapy, or it can be used as a follow-up to inpatient care.

Is Outpatient Treatment Effective in Treating Alcoholism?

Yes. Outpatient treatment can be used to treat any kind of addiction, including alcoholism. However, it will be most effective if the treatments are suitable for your individual situation.

Is Outpatient Alcohol Treatment the Best Option for Me?

Here are some things to consider when determining if outpatient alcohol treatment is right for you.

Your Home Environment: Outpatient treatment is only recommended for those with a healthy home environment. If they are going for treatment and then returning to a place where people are abusive, it will negate the effects of therapy. If you have a negative environment in your home, you are better off going for inpatient treatment.

Severity of Addiction: If you have a severe addiction, you may be better off in an inpatient facility where you can be monitored 24/7.

Your Personal Situation: For some people, inpatient treatment just isn’t an option. They may have a job that they can’t leave long term. They may be caring for a young or elderly relative that they can’t leave at home. Or they may simply be unable to afford inpatient treatment. If these types of situations apply to you, outpatient treatment will be the best option.

How to Find the Best Outpatient Alcohol Programs Near Me

If you google “outpatient alcohol programs near me,” you will find a variety of options. But which one is best for you? Here are some things to consider.

The Treatments Offered: The facility should offer treatments that are effective and best suited to your individual circumstances. They should be customized according to your needs and the underlying causes of your addiction.

Environment: The environment in the facility should be calm, comfortable, and clean.

Staff: It’s important to find a facility with a well-trained, compassionate staff.

Affordability: The facility you choose should work well with your budget. Many centers accept insurance and offer payment plans that make care more affordable.

Once you consider these factors, you will find that Atlanta Recovery Place checks off all the boxes.

Atlanta Recovery Place stands out because we offer individualized care that is best suited to each client’s needs. We take a dual diagnosis approach that simultaneously treats the addiction and its underlying cause. Our staff is compassionate and well-trained in helping patients achieve recovery.

We offer a variety of treatments, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient programs. All therapies take place in the healing environment of our Atlanta facility. We focus on the mental and physical aspects of addiction to increase the likelihood of success. Addiction is not easy to deal with, but, fortunately, there are several outpatient programs for alcoholism that can get you on the right path. Atlanta Recovery provides an approach that ensures long-term sobriety. Call us to find out how you can move on from your dependency issues and start enjoying life again.

Do I Have an Addictive Personality?

Do I Have an Addictive Personality?

In the world of health, it’s important to know if you are at high risk for certain diseases. For example, your genetics, age, weight, and ethnicity may put you at risk for cancer, heart disease, or diabetes. If this is the case, you can make lifestyle changes that lower your risk so you can stay healthy.

Well, addiction is a disease like any other, and there are several factors that can put you at high risk. Your genetics and environment play a major role. And you may also be more likely to develop dependency issues if you have an addictive personality. 

This article will help you answer the question, do I have an addictive personality, so you can make lifestyle changes to lower your risk.

What is an Addictive Personality?

To define addictive personality, it occurs in a person who is likely to develop dependency issues. Someone with an addictive personality may show the following traits. 

  • Prone to risk-taking
  • Unable to self-regulate
  • Related to others with an addiction
  • Obsessive and compulsive
  • Apathetic
  • Disconnected and cautious
  • Dealing with mental illness

What Causes an Addictive Personality?

If we break down the traits of an addictive personality, we can better understand its causes. 

For example, if you are closely related to a person who is dealing with addiction, you are more likely to develop an addiction. 

This could be because you inherited a chemical imbalance that puts you at high risk for using drugs. It could be because you learned unhealthy behaviors from this person and copied their behavior from childhood. Or it could be that the person created an unhealthy environment in the home that made you want to escape by using drugs and alcohol. 

Many of the traits listed above are related to mental illness. People with mental illness are often reluctant to reach out for help. They may be afraid of what others will think of them if they admit they have a problem. They may not have the time or money to get help or think their problem is not that bad. 

Instead of reaching out, they self-medicate to treat their symptoms. While drugs may provide temporary relief, they make matters worse in the long run. The person now has to deal with an addiction in addition to mental health issues.

You may be puzzled to find that disconnected and cautious people are at high risk of developing an addiction. These people often turn to drugs to compensate for their fears. If they continue using, a dependency will begin to form.

Do I Have an Addictive Personality?

If you exhibit the traits listed above, you may have an addictive personality. If this is the case, it’s important to moderate your drug use or avoid using drugs altogether. Try engaging in healthy hobbies and staying away from people who are a negative influence. 

If you are suffering from a mental illness, do not hesitate to reach out for help. Therapy can keep addiction from taking over your life. 

Finding Help for an Addictive Personality

The proper lifestyle can reduce the chances of developing dependency issues, but if you find yourself suffering from addiction, there are ways to get help. There are several rehab facilities that can provide you with the therapy you need. 

If you go on the internet, you will find a variety of treatment centers that offer help with addiction. Atlanta Recovery Place takes an approach that sets us apart. 

Atlanta Recovery Place integrates dual diagnosis into our therapy treatments. We target both the addiction and its underlying causes, providing a method that leads to long-term recovery. We understand that each patient is unique, and we work out customized plans that are targeted for success. 

We offer outpatient treatments, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient treatment. These allow patients to recover without disrupting their everyday lives. Clients can split their time between therapy, work, home, and whatever other responsibilities they may have. Recovery is not easy for someone with an addictive personality, but Atlanta Recovery Place’s customized approach will help you make it through. Call us to find out what’s involved in treatment. We will get you on the road to wellness and an improved quality of life.